Atole Champurrado

Atole Champurrado

In the fresh mornings of Mexico’s short winter, you can find in almost every corner small stands that sell “tamales” and warm “Atole-Champurrado”. They are kept in big tin pots to maintain the warmth.  I love this wholesome drink made with beautiful Mexican chocolate and (what else?) corn. You can make a simple version with easy-to-find ingredients. Check our new groceries directory and an explanation video Champurrado         Ingredients: 500 ml water 500 ml milk 40 gr. corn flour 50 gr. of  pure cocoa 50 gr. rapadura sugar (or raw sugar) 1 tea spoon ground cinnamon  ...
Mexican show in Canberra

Mexican show in Canberra

Music and dance to celebrate Mexico September is a patriotic month for all Mexicans. We celebrate our independence day with great parties all over the world. This year, a great Mexican musician that lives in Australia has brought to our bush capital an incredible event of traditional music and dance you just can’t miss. Check all the info...
The Great Victorian Rail Trail

The Great Victorian Rail Trail

A WEEKEND PUBBING AND CYCLING Last ANZAC long weekend offered an opportunity for Richard and I to explore a bit of the country. We decided to visit Victoria and explore the “Great Victorian rail trail”, we would take our bikes and go from Yea to Molesworth and explore the tunnel in the middle. On top of that, we decided to make this a “Pub weekend” in which we would only have counter food. PUBLIC HOTELS AND CANTINAS Pubs are the equivalent of Mexican cantinas to which I have already dedicated a few words previously. Just as Cantinas, some Pubs are in a current decline, where the entertainments they offer don’t seem to match the needs of glamorous cities such as Melbourne or Sydney. But Pubs in small towns seem to be different. They seem to adapt better to a quiet life and some of them can even be the social center in town, or even attract a big quantity of tourists. Some others have renovated and improved their facilities and food quality, in order to bring more customers. FIRST COUNTER MEAL We started our journey by having lunch at the “Criterion Hotel” in Gundagai. The building is a classic Art Deco style with a few bad renovations here and there. Food was great, the kind of meal you expect from a Pub, fresh and nice. We wanted traditional counter meals and that is exactly what we had, when we ordered a hamburger and a BLT. We ate at the beer garden which is a nice veranda looking towards a park. This was our first stop, and we still had...
Mexican Green Tomatoes

Mexican Green Tomatoes

This blog entry is dedicated to those delicious, tangy beautiful fruits called green tomatoes that drive Mexicans and Australians crazy. They are not unripen red tomatoes, nor are they Asian green tomatoes. Mexican green tomatoes (physalis ixocarpa among others) come from a different family than red tomatoes and are covered by a sticky husk that all Mexican kids have had to peel at least once in their lives. You say tomato and we say tomate (or tomatillo?), let’s call the whole thing off! There are many varieties of this green tomato along the American continent and just in Mexico the same fruit can have different names depending on the region it is cultivated or its size. Some of these names are: tomate verde (green tomato), tomatillo (small tomato), miltomate (smaller variety meaning maize field tomato), guatomate (variety from Puebla), tomate de bolsa (bag tomato), tomate de cáscara (husked tomato). Uses and Location   Mexicans commonly use green tomatoes in their daily diet, whether it is in a raw, cooked or pickled version. It goes great with different chillies, the most common preparation being a salsa with raw or boiled tomatoes along with Serrano chillies and coriander. It is also used to prepare stews with pork, beef and chicken. Some of the most popular dishes are chilaquiles and enchiladas, which are made of fried tortillas soaked in green salsa, accompanied by fresh onion, sour cream and cheese.   Currently in Australia, it is more and more common to find salsas prepared with green tomatoes (besides the classic red colour salsas). In supermarkets look for the “Mexican food” aisle and they might have green salsa. Remember...
Tequila: Fad or Tradition

Tequila: Fad or Tradition

When I sat down with Ruben Puente to talk about the introduction of tequila brand Alacran into Australia, the first thing he mentioned was his childhood memories with his grandad. Tequila for Ruben is an old family tradition that was passed from his ancestors to him, therefore the logical thing to do was to be part of a great Tequila project such as Alacran. Promoting a brand takes knowledge and engagement, which comes natural for Ruben, when we talk about tequila. He learnt how, what and when to drink from his grandfather who was a connoisseur of the production techniques. Trendy or not? Over the years Ruben learnt about trendy spirits and how they have played and important part of pop culture. But also it is important to stick around after the fad fades away. This can only be accomplished by presenting the public with a high quality product in a well delivered branding. Alacran’s launch in 2010 generated a great expectation in Mexico’s media and has been able to bring a great quality standard, which has positioned it as a favourite among the national market. Alacran is also being recognised in bars around Soho, New York and currently its introduction to the Australian market has been a great success. What is it about? It is about a lifestyle. The fashionable “black bottle” of Alacran delivers a clear silver tequila with a crisp taste, easy to mix in order to create fabulous contemporary cocktails and to enjoy on its own with a little “sangrita”, the classic tomato juice prepared for tequila that Ruben’s grandad used to love. But Alacran is...