Arroz rojo (Red rice)

Arroz rojo (Red rice)

This is a Mexican favourite, for its great flavour and versatility to be combined with main dishes such as mole, or even on its own with a fried egg and a good splash of salsa. Here is the recipe: Ingredients: 1 cup of long or medium rice 3 or 4 roma tomatoes (pending on the size) 2 chicken stock cubes (if vegan change for veggie stock) 2 cups of water 1 small carrot in small cubes 1 tbsp cooking oil Preparation: In a blender pour the tomatoes and water and blend until smooth In a hot cooking pot pour oil and rice. Move constantly to avoid burning. When the rice is transparent add the tomato water, the chicken stock cubes and the carrot Bring down to low heat and let boil When water is close to full evaporation, check if rice is tender. If not, add half a cup of extra water and continue the cooking process until all water has evaporated. Check constantly to avoid burning. Enjoy!...
Rajas con Crema y Queso (Creamy chillies)

Rajas con Crema y Queso (Creamy chillies)

“Rajas con crema”  literally means “slices with cream”. The name derives from the ingredients poblano chilli slices and sour cream. This time I added a few other ingredients that give it a great flavour. It is best eaten with tortillas or Red rice. Ingredients: 5 poblano chillies (or use 8 jalapeño chillies or 4 green capsicums if you don’t like spicy) 300 gr sliced mushrooms 1 small brown onion sliced 1 can corn kernels (or the equivalent in fresh kernels) 200 gr halloumi cheese 200 gr sour cream 1 tbsp cooking oil Preparation: In a fryer pan or an iron base, toast the chillies until black. Put the chillies in a plastic bag and leave for 5 minutes. Slice the mushrooms and onion Open your water tab with cold water. Take one chilli at a time out the bag and rub the skin out, under the water. Be careful not to burn your self. Open the chilli and take all the seeds out also. Set aside and repeat the exercise with every chilli Cut the halloumi cheese in 0.5 cm cubes In a hot fryer pan, pour the oil along with the mushrooms and onion Slice the chillies and add to pan when the onions are transparent. Mix with the mushrooms and onion Add the corn kernels drained and the helium cubes. Cook for a minute or two Add sour cream and mix with all the ingredients. Add salt if needed (the halloumi cheese is pretty salty)...
Revolutionary BBQ

Revolutionary BBQ

Last 20 November Mexico commemorated 104 years since the Mexican Revolution; an armed struggle that modified Mexico’s social, economic and political lifeand established the base for the country’s 20th century development. To remember this moment, Richard and I decided to throw a Mexi-Aussie BBQ; we invited friends to try Mexican delicacies along with traditional barbequed sausages and burgers whilst wearing some Mexican props. The result: a bunch of full and happy bellies. There were horchata ice pops, carrot and cucumber salad with hot chilli as starters and you can find the recipes here. As for drinks, classic Mexican beer set the tone and for the kids there were tasty Jarritos, the classic Mexican soda that has beautiful colours and flavours such as tamarind, pineapple, fruit punch, mandarin and even Mexican cola! Courtesy of Jarritos Australia, our guests enjoyed these refreshing drinks that quench their thirst in a hot Saturday afternoon. Chrissy, Adrian and Jenny loved the pineapple and lemon Jarritos! Everybody had a favourite flavour and it went really well with the BBQ meats. The best thing is that Jarritos are available in many supermarkets and even online if you would l ike to keep a stash at home. Check their website: www.jarritos.com.au Note: Soft drinks were provided by Jarritos Australia.  ...
Red Chilaquiles

Red Chilaquiles

This is the best way to take advantage of old tortillas in Mexico. It is also great for hangovers as they tend to be really hot. You can make them whatever way you like it. They can be accompanied by scramble or fried eggs for breakfast, or chicken or steak for lunch and dinner. Ingredients 1 dozen white corn tortillas (the older the better) 3 to 4 green chillies (or to taste) 6 tomatoes 4 spoons cooking oil 1/2 onion julienne sour cream feta cheese Method Steps Cut the tortillas in medium squares. Heat the oil in a frier pan; once hot put the tortillas to fry until crispy. Set aside. On a food processor or blender put the tomatoes and chillies, add a bit of water (1/4 high to the top of the tomatoes approx.) and blend. Put a little bit of the remaining oil you used to fry the tortillas in a 4 lt. sauce pan. Once the oil is a bit hot, pour the tomato and chilli blend. If it’s too thick add a bit of water or stock (chicken or veggie) and simmer. Add salt to taste. When the salsa starts boiling, add the crisp tortilla chips into it and let the sink. Turn the heat off. Serve o a plate with a spoon of sour cream a bit of onion Julienne and bits of feta cheese (in Mexico we use fresh cheese). This will calm the heat from the...
Molletes

Molletes

Molletes are the perfect brunch or light dinner. You can make them as vegan as you want. They go together with “pico de gallo” salsa which you can find on our Salsa section. [ingredients] [method] Ingredients 2 baguettes or 8 bread rolls Butter or margarine 1 can Black or Borlotti beans (non baked) 300 gr or 16 slices Colby cheese (substitute with vegan cheddar cheese) 2 spoons Olive oil Method Steps Turn your oven on to 150 degrees (120 for fan force) Cut each baguette in 4 even pieces and cut each through the middle. Take the bread filling out. Spread the butter or margarine on bread. Leave aside On a mid heat fryer pan add 1 spoon of Olive oil. Pour the can of beans and start smashing with a potato masher until you get a smooth mix. Add the second spoon of oil and check salt. Let them boil and then cool down for 3 minutes. Spread the beans on the bread leaving a thick layer. Cover beans with cheese slices. Put beans on a baking tray and into the oven until the cheese has melted. Serve with “Pico de Gallo” on the...
Pot Mole (Mole de Olla)

Pot Mole (Mole de Olla)

It was one of those really cold days of Canberra winter. As Doso my dog and I were fastened in front of the gas heater, I called my mother to Mexico an told her about the cold weather. Then my mom said, “Why don’t you make “Mole de olla” (or Pot mole) to fight the cold?” Mole de olla is considered the simplest and the most humbled of all moles and it resembles more a runny (almost soupy) dish than a mole. Yet, it is a great dish with nice smoky flavour and great for winter for the vitamins and vegetables it contains. According to Chef Ricardo Muñoz Zurita in his Dictionary of Mexican Gastronomy published by Larousse, Pot Mole is a broth usually made with beef or pork, with chillies and vegetables, typical of Mexico City and the centre region. There are different variations, and today I bring you (as usual) my mother’s recipe. All ingredients can be fetched here in Australia. If you have any trouble finding an ingredient please contact me. Method Steps On your gas stove toast the chillies. You can also toast them in the oven. Blend the toasted chillies, the tomatoes and onion until you have a salsa. Put your pressure cooker on sauté mode, or put your pot on the fire and add the cooking oil. Strain the sauce over the pot and fry. Add the beef stock and check for salt. Add osso buco and vegetables and cover pot. In a pressure cooker should take 40 mins, double the time for a normal one or until the meat is tender. Serve...