Pot Mole (Mole de Olla)

Pot Mole (Mole de Olla)

It was one of those really cold days of Canberra winter. As Doso my dog and I were fastened in front of the gas heater, I called my mother to Mexico an told her about the cold weather. Then my mom said, “Why don’t you make “Mole de olla” (or Pot mole) to fight the cold?” Mole de olla is considered the simplest and the most humbled of all moles and it resembles more a runny (almost soupy) dish than a mole. Yet, it is a great dish with nice smoky flavour and great for winter for the vitamins and vegetables it contains. According to Chef Ricardo Muñoz Zurita in his Dictionary of Mexican Gastronomy published by Larousse, Pot Mole is a broth usually made with beef or pork, with chillies and vegetables, typical of Mexico City and the centre region. There are different variations, and today I bring you (as usual) my mother’s recipe. All ingredients can be fetched here in Australia. If you have any trouble finding an ingredient please contact me. Method Steps On your gas stove toast the chillies. You can also toast them in the oven. Blend the toasted chillies, the tomatoes and onion until you have a salsa. Put your pressure cooker on sauté mode, or put your pot on the fire and add the cooking oil. Strain the sauce over the pot and fry. Add the beef stock and check for salt. Add osso buco and vegetables and cover pot. In a pressure cooker should take 40 mins, double the time for a normal one or until the meat is tender. Serve...
My Smutty Chicken

My Smutty Chicken

Corn smut, better known as Mexican or corn truffle is a fungus that grows on maize and teosinte. I imagine that when indigenous people in Mexico found this little “bugger” in their crops, they decided not to go hungry and instead found one of the greatest delicacies worldwide. Cuitlacoche (yeah, I have trouble with the pronunciation too!) or Mexican truffle has a strong earthy flavour, and it is best combined with green chilli and/epazote. It has a fabulous dark, almost black colour and it might give your food an amazing contrast. I created this easy-to-make recipe, so that my readers can be introduced to this amazing truffle. Feel free to test and try, just remember this fungus looooves corn, so don’t forget to include it on any attempt, whether is in kernels, a tortilla or chilaquiles as a side. All ingredients can be obtained within Australia. If you need more information please send me a message or write a comment. Ingredients 1 Can corn truffle (Cuitlacoche) 400 gr Chicken breast 2 Green chillies (finely sliced) ¼ Onion (finely sliced) ¼ Cup corn kernels (fresh or frozen) 3 Spoons of cooking oil Epazote (Jesuits herb) Method Steps On a hot big fryer pan pour 1 spoon of oil. Add the sliced chillies and onion and cook until onions are translucent. Add the other two spoons of oil and put the chicken in the pan. Add salt and let brown. Add corn kernels and truffle along with epazote to taste. Cook for another 5 mins. Serve with warm...
Green Chilaquiles

Green Chilaquiles

This green version of the traditional dish of chilaquiles is the perfect hangover food. With a tangy flavour from the green tomatoes, and the full texture from corn tortillas it gives you energy, making it also perfect to have as breakfast before a busy day. You can serve it with eggs, chicken or steak. Serves: 4 People Preparing time: 20 mins. Ready in: 2 mins Ingredients 1 Dozen white corn tortillas (the older the better) 3 to 4 Green chillies 1 Can of green tomatoes 4 Spoons of cooking oil 1/2 Onion julienne Sour cream Feta or Cheddar cheese Method Cut the tortillas in medium squares; heat the oil in a frying pan; once hot put the tortillas to fry until crispy. Set aside. On a food processor or blender put the green tomatoes and chillies, add some of the brine from the tomatoes (1/4 high to the top of the tomatoes approx.) and blend. Put a little bit of the remaining oil you used to fry the tortillas in a 4 lt. saucepan; once the oil is medium hot, pour the tomato and chilli blend. If it’s too thick add a bit of water or stock (chicken or veggie) and simmer. Add salt to taste. When the salsa starts boiling, add the crisp tortilla chips into it and let them sink. Turn the heat off. Serve on a plate with a spoon of sour cream a bit of onion Julienne and bits of cheese (in Mexico we use “fresh” or “Manchego” type cheese). This will calm the heat from the...